Thursday, September 22, 2016

Seattle, Seattle!


As I walked off the plane, I was greeted by a crisp, cool hug from the air around me. After a storybook descent into a land of green isles and peninsulas enveloped by deep blue seas, I kept thinking, "Life! This place breeds life!" 

In summary, Seattle knows how to grow stuff. Grapes fall from shaded awnings, full pumpkins pop up unexpectedly in backyards, $5 flower bouquets are so bright and full, they put most $40 bouquets to shame. And the green. Oh, the green. So much green, everywhere. So much bounty. 


{Skyline view from the ferry to Bainbridge Island}

{Gawking at referenced $5 bouquets}  

 {Happily accepting kisses I usually have to steal}


{Curing toddler wiggles at Pike Place Market}


{Bainbridge Island giggle fits} 



{#bringthekids}

Tuesday, September 20, 2016

Wholeness

I've had this tab open for several days because I don't want to forget this quote. If I had found it in a magazine, I would have cut it out and pasted it on my refrigerator. But since webpages are the new magazines, I suppose blogs are the new refrigerators? 
I actually attack the concept of happiness. The idea that—I don't mind people being happy—but the idea that everything we do is part of the pursuit of happiness seems to me a really dangerous idea and has led to a contemporary disease in Western society, which is fear of sadness. It's a really odd thing that we're seeing people saying "write down three things that made you happy today before you go to sleep" and "cheer up" and "happiness is our birthright" and so on. We're kind of teaching our kids that happiness is the default position. It's rubbish. Wholeness is what we ought to be striving for and part of that is sadness, disappointment, frustration, failure; all of those things which make us who we are. Happiness and victory and fulfillment are nice little things that also happen to us, but they don't teach us much. Everyone says we grow through pain and then as soon as they experience pain they say, "Quick! Move on! Cheer up!" I'd like just for a year to have a moratorium on the word "happiness" and to replace it with the word "wholeness." Ask yourself, "Is this contributing to my wholeness?" and if you're having a bad day, it is.     
- Hugh MacKay, author of The Good Life